Tuesday, 2 June 2015

Reading round-up: May

May 2015 books

The Loney by Andrew Michael Hurley - 8/10. Full review / Buy the ebook
Outline by Rachel Cusk - 8/10. Full review / Buy the ebook
Idiopathy by Sam Byers - 8/10. Full review / Buy the ebook
The Ghost Network by Catie Disabato - 9/10. Full review / Buy the ebook
The Woman Upstairs by Claire Messud - 8/10. Full review / Buy the ebook
A Certain Smile by Françoise Sagan - 8/10. Full review / Buy the book
Sweet Caress: The Many Lives of Amory Clay by William Boyd - 6/10. Full review / Pre-order the book
Death is a Welcome Guest by Louise Welsh - 6/10. Full review / Pre-order the ebook
The Meek One by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - 9/10. Full review / Buy the book
Girl at War by Sara Nović - 7/10. Full review / Buy the ebook
The Seed Collectors by Scarlett Thomas - 4/10. Pre-order the ebook
The Seducer's Diary by Søren Kierkegaard - 7/10. Buy the book
Vertigo by Boileau-Narcejac - 8/10. Pre-order the book
All This Has Nothing To Do With Me by Monica Sabolo - 5/10. Buy the ebook
Asylum Piece by Anna Kavan - 8/10. Buy the ebook
Pretty Is by Maggie Mitchell - 7/10. Pre-order the ebook
Slights by Kaaron Warren - 7/10. Buy the ebook
Burning Secret by Stefan Zweig - 7/10. Buy the ebook

At the beginning of May I went to Portugal for a few days, and at the end of May I went to Venice for the best part of a week. The two holidays account for how many books I managed to read this month, as well as how few of them I've actually reviewed. I decided not to do a summary for each of these because a) it'd take me forever and b) nobody would read them anyway... Proper reviews of the last 9 are coming soon, but in the meantime the highlights of May were:

  • The Ghost Network by Catie Disabato - the best book I read this month. Part faux-academic text, part conspiracy thriller, part postmodern, ultra-meta reflection on fan culture, it was so much fun to read and had me on the edge of my seat all the way through.
  • Idiopathy by Sam Byers, if only for the unforgettable, brilliantly misanthropic antiheroine Katherine.
  • Claire Messud's The Woman Upstairs. I vacillated between love and hate for the protagonist Nora, but parts of the book seemed to have looked straight into my soul, and I suspect it will stay with me for a long time.
  • The Meek One by Fyodor Dostoyevsky - a short story published separately as part of the Penguin Little Black Classics series. It's the dark and horribly funny tale of a man who drives his wife to suicide, and it completely throws you into the narrator's worldview.
  • The Loney by Andrew Michael Hurley. An incredibly atmospheric folk-horror story that makes its bleak, rain-washed setting so real it's terrifying.

  • Of course, there were some disappointments too. The biggest one was The Seed Collectors by Scarlett Thomas. I've genuinely been waiting years for this book and fully expected to adore it, but I found it such a letdown I'm just baffled. Another much-anticipated novel, Death is a Welcome Guest by Louise Welsh - book 2 in the Plague Times trilogy - was perfectly okay but just not a patch on the brilliance of its predecessor, A Lovely Way To Burn.

    On the agenda for June: sorting through 200+ photos of Venice and getting to grips with a new Kindle...

    Twitter | Goodreads | Tumblr | Bloglovin’ | Shop

    0 comments:

    Post a Comment